Virtual Tourism

Virtual tourism, google maps mashup, google video

Ngorongoro Crater


The Ngorongoro Crater is the world's largest unbroken volcanic caldera. The crater is 610m deep and the floor is 260km squared. The steep sides of the crater mean that it has become a natural enclosure for a very wide variety of wildlife, including most of the species found in East Africa.

Aside from herds of zebra, gazelle and wildebeest, the crater is home to the "big five" of rhinoceros, lion, leopard, elephant and buffalo. The crater plays host to almost every individual species of wildlife in East Africa, and there are an estimated 25,000 animals within the crater. Lake Magadi in the centre of the crater is, like many in the rift valley, a soda lake supporting flocks of flamingo.

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Agnano Crater, Napoli


Agnano is a volcanic crater in Napoli, Italy, situated northwest of Naples in the Campi Flegrei region. It was popular among both Greeks and Romans, and was famed for its hot springs, as well as the practice of witchcraft.

A lake formed in the Middle Ages, and this was drained in 1870 to increase arable land and reduce the habitat of the Anopheles mosquito, which carries the malaria parasite. The crater is now home to the Agnano hippodrome and a few hotels.

Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Nàpule, from Greek - Nea Polis - meaning "New City"; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. The city has a population of about 1 million. By one count the metropolitan area of Naples is the second largest in Italy after that of Milan, with over 4,200,000 inhabitants. As with most major cities, various other urban and metropolitan area population figures are also available. The inhabitants are known as Neapolitans, napulitane in Neapolitan, napoletani or poetically partenopei in Italian. It is located halfway between the Vesuvius volcano and a separate volcanic area, the Campi Flegrei, all part of the Campanian volcanic arc.

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Niagara Fort


Standing on a bluff above Lake Ontario not far from Niagara Falls, Old Fort Niagara has dominated the entrance to the Niagara River since 1726. The colorful history of the site began even earlier, and continues to the present day.

The fort played an important role in the struggles of France, Great Britain, and the United States to control the Great Lakes region of North America, and also helped shape the destinies of the Iroquois (Six Nations) peoples and the nation of Canada.

Today Old Fort Niagara is a National Historic Landmark and New York State Historic Site that welcomes more than 100,000 visitors every year. It offers a unique collection of original military architecture and fortifications from the 18th Century and the 19th Century, as well as living history events and programs, historical exhibits and collections, archaeology, and education.

The fort has become one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Niagara area, featuring the oldest buildings in the Great Lakes, spectacular scenery, and exciting special events.

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Golden Temple, Amritsar


Harmandir Sahib or Darbar Sahib (also Hari Mandir, Harimandar and other variants) is the most sacred shrine in Sikhism, located in Amritsar, Punjab, India. It is widely known as the Golden Temple, but its true name is Harmandir Sahib. Literally, Harmandir means "the Temple of God", 'Har' being a term for God and 'Mandir' meaning Temple. Sikh devotees from all over the world come to the Temple to enjoy its blissful environs and offer their prayers. In addition, the sacred shrine is increasingly becoming a tourist attraction for visitors from all over the world.

Amritsar is located in the Majha region of the Punjab. Majha is also known as the Bari Doab, since it is the Doab or (fluvial) tract of land which lies between two of the five great rivers of the province, the Ravi and the Beas. As such, Majha lies in the heart of the ancient Punjab region. Besides Amritsar, it comprises of Gurdaspur, Batala and Tarn Taran Sahib.

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Temple of Heaven, Beijing


The Temple of Heaven, literally the Altar of Heaven is a complex of Taoist buildings situated in southeastern urban Beijing, in Xuanwu District. Construction of the complex began in 1420, and was thereafter visited by all subsequent Emperors of the Ming and Qing dynasties. It is regarded as a Taoist temple, although the worship of Heaven, especially by the reigning monarch of the day, pre-dates Taoism.

The Temple grounds covers 2.73 km² of parkland, and comprises three main groups of constructions, all built according to strict philosophical requirements:

The Earthly Mount is the altar proper. It is an empty platform on three levels of marble stones, where the Emperor prayed for favourable weather;
The House of Heavenly Lord, a single-gabled circular building, built on a single level of marble stone base, where the altars were housed when not in use;
The Hall of Annual Prayer , a magnificent triple-gabled circular building, built on three levels of marble stone base, where the Emperor prayed for good harvests

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Seto-Ohashi Bridge


The Seto-Ohashi Bridge is the longest combined road and rail bridge in the world.

The route via the Seto Ohashi Bridge was the first of the three routes linking Honshu and Shikoku opened to traffic. In an area studded with many islands, this route hops from one island to another across the Seto Inland Sea. Joining the city of Kurashiki in Okayama Prefecture on the Honshu side with Sakaide City in Kagawa Prefecture on the Shikoku side, the complete route was opened in 1988. Stretching across a total distance of 9.4 kilometers (5.8 miles) there are six bridge sections that span the gaps between islands that lie between the two cities, as well as four viaducts on the islands themselves. The whole route is a double-decker construction, with an expressway running above a railway. In terms of scale, it is the largest combined road and rail bridge system in the world. Among all, the 1100-meter (3,609-foot) central span of the 1,723-meter (5,653-foot) long Minami Bisan Seto Ohashi Bridge at the southernmost end is on its own the world's longest combined road and rail bridge.

Construction began in October, 1978. A total of over 1 trillion yen (7,692 million dollars; $1=130yen) was spent on this huge project, and it took ten years to be completed in April 1988. At present only normal trains are accommodated, but for future integration into the national high-speed railway network, the railway section is also designed to accommodate Shinkansen "bullet" trains. Due consideration has been given to the forces of nature, and the structure can withstand winds of up to 65 meters per second (146.25 m.p.h.) and earthquakes of magnitude 8.5.

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Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao


The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, was designed by Frank Gehry and opened to the public in 1997. The museum's design and construction serve as an object lesson in Frank Gehry's style and method. Like much of Gehry's other work, the structure consists of radically sculpted, organic contours.

Sited as it is in a port town, it is intended to resemble a ship. Its brilliantly reflective panels resemble fish scales, echoing the other organic (and, in particular, fish-like) forms that recur commonly in Gehry's designs, as well as the river Nervión upon which the museum sits. Also in typical Gehry fashion, the building is uniquely a product of the period's technology. Computer-aided design (CATIA) and visualizations were used heavily in the structure's design.

Computer simulations of the building's structure made it feasible to build shapes that architects of earlier eras would have found nearly impossible to construct. Also important is that while the museum is a spectacular monument from the river, on street level it is quite modest and does not overwhelm its traditional surroundings. The museum was opened as part of a revitalization effort for the city of Bilbao and for the Basque Country. Almost immediately after its opening, the Guggenheim Bilbao became a popular tourist attraction, drawing visitors from around the globe. It was widely credited with "putting Bilbao on the map".

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Grand Place, Lille


Lille (Ryssel in old texts) is a city in northern France on the Deûle River. It is the capital of the Nord-Pas de Calais région. It is also the prefecture (capital) of the Nord departement. It lies near the border with Belgium and its Dutch name is Rijsel. The name Lille comes from insula or l'Isla, since the area was at one time marshy. This name was used for the Count of Flanders' castle (Château du Buc), built on dry land in the middle of the marsh.

The city of Lille absorbed Lomme on February 27, 2000. Their combined population at the 1999 census was 212,597 inhabitants. The whole metropolitan area of Lille, both on French and Belgian territory (Kortrijk) was estimated in 2000 at around 1,730,000 inhabitants, ranking as one of the major metropolitan areas of Europe.

In the 19th century Lille became the centre of French industry due to the large nearby coal deposits. It thus became a central part of the country's rail network.

The legend of "Lyderic and Phinaert" puts the foundation of the city of "L'Isle" at 640. Although the first mention of the town appears in archives from the year 1066, some archeological digs seem to show the area as inhabited by as early as 2000 BCE, most notably in the modern-day quartiers of Fives, Wazemmes, and Old Lille.

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Daibutsu, Kamakura


The Great Buddha of Kamakura (Daibutsu) is a monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amida Buddha in the Kotokuin Temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.

It is believed that the statue was originally cast in 1252, following an idea by the priest Joko, who also collected donations to build it. The sculptors were One-Goroemon and Tanj i-Hisatomo.

The statue is approximately 13.35m tall and weighs approximately 93 tons. The statue is hollow, and visitors can view the interior.

The Great Buddha was originally housed in a temple, but this was washed away by a tsunami in 1498, since then the statue has stood in the open air. Repairs were carried out in 1960-1961, when the neck was strengthened and measures were taken to protect it from earthquakes.

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Reichstag, Berlin


The Reichstag building in Berlin was constructed to house the Reichstag, the original parliament of the German Empire. It was opened in 1894 and housed the Reichstag until 1933. It again became the seat of the German parliament in 1999 after a reconstruction led by internationally renowned architect Norman Foster.

Today's parliament of Germany is called the Bundestag. The Reichstag as a parliament dates back to the Holy Roman Empire and ceased to act as a true parliament in the years of Nazi Germany (1933-1945). In today's usage, the German term Reichstag refers to the building, while the term Bundestag refers to the institution.

Construction of the building began only well after 1871. Previously, the parliament had assembled in several other buildings in the Leipziger Straße in Berlin; but these were generally considered too small, so in 1872 an architectural contest with 103 participating architects was carried out to erect an all-new building. Work did not start until ten years later though, due to various problems with purchasing property for the new building and arguments between Wilhelm I, Otto von Bismarck, and the members of the Reichstag about how the construction should be performed.

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Loch Ness


Loch Ness (Scottish Gaelic: Loch Nis) is a large, deep freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 km (23 miles) southwest of Inverness. The Loch's surface is 15.8 metres above sea level.

Loch Ness is best known for the alleged sightings of the legendary Loch Ness Monster ("Nessie"), although it is scenic in its own right. Boat cruises operate from various locations along its shores giving tourists the chance to look for the monster.

Loch Ness is the largest body of water on the geologic fault known as the Great Glen, which runs from Inverness in the north to Fort William in the south. The Caledonian Canal, which links the sea at either end of the Great Glen, uses Loch Ness for part of its route.

The loch is one of a series of interconnected, murky bodies of water in Scotland. Quite large, Loch Ness has exceptionally low water visibility due to a high peat content in the surrounding soil. It is the second deepest loch in Scotland, and the UK.

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Romer Plaza, Frankfurt am Main


The Romer, which means Roman, has been the city hall or Rathaus of Frankfurt am Main for 600 years and the middle-age building is one of the city's most important landmarks. The Haus Römer is actually the middle building of a set of three located in the Romerberg plaza. The Romer merchant family sold it together with a second building, the Goldener Schwan (Golden Swan), to the city council on March 11, 1405 and it was converted for use as the city hall.

The Romer is not a museum and is actually used by the city for various purposes, for example as a Standesamt or civil registration office; for example, the wedding rooms are located in the first and second floor of the Haus Löwenstein.

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Sagrada Familia


La Sagrada Familia has to be one of the most interesting buildings in the world. It is a large Roman Catholic basilica still under construction in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The formal title of the basilica is the Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família or Expiatory Temple of the Holy Family. It is the last, and perhaps most extraordinary, of the designs of the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí.

The Sagrada Família was planned in the late 19th century and construction work, under the supervison of Antoni Gaudí, commenced in the 1880s. After disagreements between the founding association and the original architect Francesco del Villar, Gaudí was assigned the project in 1883 and created an entirely new design. At the time, the basilica stood in an empty field over a mile away from urban Barcelona.

Gaudí worked on the project for over 40 years, devoting the last 15 years of his life entirely to this endeavour; on the subject of the extremely long construction, Gaudí is said to have joked, "My client is not in a hurry." Work was interrupted by the Spanish Civil War in 1935 and recommenced in the 1950s.

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Grand Palace, Thailand


The Grand Palace (Phra Borom Maha Ratcha Wang) is a complex of buildings in Bangkok, Thailand. It served as the official residence of the king of Thailand from the 18th century to early in the 20th century. Construction on the palace complex began in 1782 during the reign of Rama I.

The palace complex sits on the Chao Phraya River, at 13°45'00N, 100°29'30E. The other approaches to the palace are protected by a defensive wall of length 1900 m, which encloses an area of 218400 square metres Further out from the wall is a canal dug also for defensive purposes, making the area surrounding the palace Rattanakosin Island.

Prominent parts of the Grand Palace include the Wat Phra Kaew, the temple containing the Emerald Buddha and the
Chakri Mahaprasad Hall, a building in a style influenced by the Italian Renaissance.

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Theaterplatz, Dresden


Dresden (Sorbian: Drjezdzany; etymologically from old sorbian Drezdany meaning people of the riverside forest) is the capital city of the German Federal State of Saxony and situated in a valley on the River Elbe. The city's population is 490,000 (2006) and the population in its agglomeration is 1.1 million. Dresden is part of the metropolitan area Saxon Triangle with a population of over 3.2 million.

Dresden has a long history as capital and Royal residence for the Kings of Saxony with centuries of extraordinary cultural and artistic splendor. The controversial Bombing of Dresden in World War II and 40 years of GDR changed the face of the city dramatically.

Since German re-unification Dresden has been an important cultural, political, and economic center in the Eastern part of the Federal Republic of Germany. The accompanying video shows Theaterplatz, which is in the centre of the city beside the river.

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Heidelberg Schloss


Heidelberg Castle (German: Heidelberger Schloss) is a castle in the German city of Heidelberg. Originally a fort, it was transformed into a castle in 1544. Over the centuries, it has been damaged by war and fire. It still stands over the Neckar River today. It is also the home of the enormous Heidelberg Tun, a wine barrel with a capacity of some 200,000 litres.

The Heidelberg Tun (Grosse Fass in German) is an extremely large wine vat contained within the cellars of Heidelberg Castle. It has a capacity of approximately 220,017 litres (58,124 gallons). Made in 1751, 130 oak trees were reputedly used in its construction. It has only rarely been used. A dance floor was constructed on top of the tun. It is now a popular tourist attraction in Heidelberg.

The Tun is referenced in Jules Verne's novel Five Weeks in a Balloon, Washington Irving in The Specter Bridegroom, Mary Hazelton Wade's Bertha and by Mark Twain in A Tramp Abroad. It can also be found in Herman Melville's "Moby Dick".

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Taj Mahal


Google have completed a huge update of hi-res Satellite imagery on Google Maps. You can now see the Taj Mahal in all its glory. The Taj Mahal is a monument located in Agra in India, constructed between 1631 and 1654 by a workforce of 20,000. The Muslim Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan commissioned its construction as a mausoleum for his favourite wife, Arjumand Bano Begum, who is better known as Mumtaz Mahal.

The Taj Mahal (sometimes called "the Taj") is generally considered the finest example of Mughal architecture, a style that combines elements of Indian, Persian architecture and Turkish architecture. The Taj Mahal has achieved special note because of the romance of its inspiration. While the white domed marble mausoleum is the most familiar part of the monument, the Taj Mahal is actually a complex of elements.

Shah Jahan, who commissioned the monument, was a prolific patron with effectively limitless resources. He had previously created the gardens and palaces of Shalimar in honor of his wife, Mumtaz. After her death in childbirth (she had already borne him fourteen children) Shah Jahan was reportedly inconsolable, and soon after he began construction of the Taj Mahal. His lavish aesthetic and romantic nature is apparent in every aspect of the Taj Mahal.

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You can now also see the incredible Palm Islands of Dubai up close. Unfortunately I can't find a decent video of the islands but you can view them on Google Maps here.

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Rheinfall, Switzerland


Rheinfall is just outside Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland and close to the German border. It is the largest waterfall in Europe in terms of the sheer volumes of water that flows over it. The falls are 150 m (450 ft) wide and 23 m (75 ft) high, with an average flow of some 700 m/s of water.

Schaffhausen iself has a population of 33,000. It was a city state in the Middle Ages, documented to have struck its own coins starting in 1045. For a time it was under Habsburg domination, but regained its independence in 1415. It allied itself with Zurich in 1457, and became a full member of the Swiss Confederation in 1501. The first railroad came to Schaffhausen in 1857.

Schaffhausen is located in a finger of Swiss territory surrounded on three sides by Germany. On April 1, 1944, Schaffhausen suffered a bombing raid by United States Army Air Forces aircraft which strayed from German airspace into neutral Switzerland.

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Diocletian's Palace


Diocletian's Palace is a building in Split, Croatia that was built by the emperor Diocletian the 3rd century AD. At the time it was built, there was no such city of Split, and the original town was built around the palace. The Latin name of the city, Spalatum, was derived from the original name Aspalathos, a white thorn common in the area. Contrary to the popular belief, it has nothing to do with the latin word for palace, palatium.[1]

Diocletian had this massive palace built to spend the last years of his life after abdicating on May 1, 305 AD. The bay is located on the south side of a short peninsula running out from the Dalmatian coast into the Adriatic, four miles from the site of Salona, the capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia. The terrain on which the palace was built slopes gently seaward. It is typical karst terrain, consisting of low limestone ridges running east to west with marl in the clefts between them.

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Charminar, Hyderabad


Charminar is a monument located in the City of Hyderabad which is the capital city of the State of Andhra Pradesh in South India.

The Charminar (Urdu: "Four Minars")is a monument, built in the center of Hyderabad by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah in 1591 as a commemoration of the eradication of a plague. Charminar is one of the most important landmarks of the city. Legends tell that the emperor Quli Qutb Shah prayed for the end of plague and took the vow to build a mosque on that very place. He ordered the construction of the mosque which became popular as Charminar because of its four characteristic minarets. The top floor of the four-storeyed structure has a mosque which has 45 covered prayer spaces and some open space to accommodate more people for Friday prayers.

The Charminar is a beautiful and impressive square monument, with each side measuring 20 m, and each of the edges having a pointed high minaret. It derives its name from these four gracefully carved minarets which soar to a height of 48.7 m above the ground, commanding the landscape for miles around. Charminar literally means 'Four Minars'. Each minaret has four storeys, each looking like a delicately carved ring around the minaret. Every side opens into a plaza through giant arches, which overlook four major thoroughfares and dwarf other features of the building except the minarets. Each arch is 11 m wide and rises 20 m to the pinnacle from the plinth. The monument overlooks a mosque. Once upon a time each of these arches led to four royal roads. Each of the four arches has a clock which were put up in 1889.

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Oriental Pearl Tower


The Oriental Pearl Tower is a TV tower in Shanghai, China. The Oriental Pearl Tower is located at the tip of Lujiazui in the Pudong district, by the side of Huangpu River, opposite The Bund of Shanghai. The design of the building is based on a Tang Dynasty poem about the haunting sound made by a lute.

It was designed by Jia Huan Cheng of the Shanghai Modern Architectural Design Co. Ltd. Construction began in 1991 and the tower was completed in 1995. At 468 m (1,535 feet) high, it is the tallest tower in Asia, and the third tallest tower in the world. The Oriental Pearl Tower belongs to the World Federation of Great Towers.

The tower features 5 spheres. The two biggest spheres have diameters of 50 m for the lower and 45 m for the upper. They are linked by three columns, each 9 m in diameter. The smallest and highest sphere is 14 m in diameter.

The accompanying video shows the tower garishly lit up at night.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License from Wikipedia.

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India Gate, Delhi


Situated on the Rajpath in New Delhi, India Gate (originally called the All India War Memorial) is a monument built by Edwin Lutyens to commemorate the Indian soldiers who died in the World War I and the Afghan Wars.

The foundation stone was laid on 10 February 1921 by the Duke of Connaught. The names of the soldiers who died in these wars are inscribed on the walls. It was completed in 1931. Burning under it since 1971 is the Amar Jawan Jyoti (The flame of the immortal warrior), which marks the Unknown Soldier's Tomb.

Inscribed on top of India Gate in capital letters is the line:

To the dead of the Indian armies who fell honoured in France and Flanders Mesopotamia and Persia East Africa Gallipoli and elsewhere in the near and the far-east and in sacred memory also of those whose names are recorded and who fell in India or the north-west frontier and during the Third Afgan War.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License from Wikipedia.

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Humayoun's Tomb, Delhi


Humayun's tomb is a complex of buildings of Mughal architecture located in Nizamuddin East, New Delhi. It encompasses the main tomb of the Emperor Humayun as well as numerous others, including the Barber's Tomb. The complex is a World Heritage Site and the first example of this type of Mughal architecture in India. This style of mausoleum was the same that created the Taj Mahal in Agra.

The tomb of Humayun was built by the orders of Hamida Banu Begum, Humayun's widow starting in 1562. The architect of the edifice was reportedly Sayyed Muhammad ibn Mirak Ghiyathuddin and his father Mirak Ghiyathuddin who were brought in from Herat. It took 8 years to build and had a Chahr Bagh Garden style in its design, the first of its kind in the region.

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Spinnaker Tower, Portsmouth


Today's video is a panorama of Portsmouth Harbour from Gosport. Across the harbour you can see the new Spinnaker Tower, the tallest accessible structure in the United Kingdom outside of London. In the foreground you can see one of the many ferries operating out of Portsmouth Harbour. Many of the ferries travel to the nearby Isle of Wight but I think most of those travel from the Spinnaker Tower side of the harbour.

The tower represents sails billowing in the wind, a design accomplished using two large, white, sweeping steel arcs, which give the tower its distinctive spinnaker sail design. At the top is a triple observation deck, providing a 320 degree view of the city of Portsmouth, the Langstone and Portsmouth harbours, and a viewing distance of 37 kilometres (23 miles). The glass floor is the largest in Europe.

This design was chosen from a selection of concept designs through a vote offered to Portsmouth residents.

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Yokohama Landmark Tower


The Yokohama Landmark Tower is the tallest building in Japan. It is located in the Minato Mirai 21 district of Yokohama city. Its height is about 296 meters (972 feet). The building contains a hotel which occupies floors 49-70. The lower 48 floors are used as offices and retail. Work on the building was finished in the year 1996. The building contains two tuned mass dampers on the (hidden) 71st floor on opposite corners of the buildings, designed to reduce sway.

The tower also contains the world's second fastest elevator, which travels at 1 floor per second, reaching the 60th floor at the top in around 1 minute.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License from Wikipedia.

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The Golden Domes of Kiev


Today's offering features two religious videos from Kiev in the Ukraine. St. Michael's Golden-Domed Cathedral is the second largest medieval church in Kiev. It is also one of the three churches in the St. Demetrius Monastery, later known as the St. Michael of the Golden Domes Monastery.

The Lavra Monestary (also known as the Kiev Monastery of the Caves), is an ancient cave monastery in Kiev. It was founded in 1051 by monks Anthony and Theodosius, and has become an important centre of Orthodox Christianity.

Currently, the Kiev Pechersk Lavra also serves as the residence of Metropolitan Volodymyr (Viktor Sabodan), the head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.


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St Tropez


St Tropez is one of a number of resorts in the South of France which have become the almost exclusive playgrounds of the rich. The video starts a little hectically (check out the guy running in mid-air), but settles down after 12 seconds. After the initial loud music the soundtrack features a great song, which sounds like Kate Bush to me (if you know the name of the track please leave a comment). St Tropez looks to be a beautiful town, I wish I could afford to stay there.


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Kolner Dom


Cologne Cathedral (Kolner Dom, official name Hohe Domkirche St. Peter und Maria) is one of the best-known architectural monuments in Germany and has been Cologne's (Koln's) most famous landmark since its completion in the late 19th century. The cathedral is under the administration of the Roman Catholic Church and is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne. From 1880, when its spires were completed, it was the world's tallest structure, losing its title on the completion of the Washington Monument in Washington DC, 1884. Cologne Cathedral remains the second-tallest Gothic structure in the world; only the steeple of the Ulm Munster is higher.

Construction of the gothic church began in 1248 and took, with interruptions, more than 600 years to complete - it was finally finished in 1880. The two towers are 157m tall, the cathedral is 144m long and 86m wide. The cathedral is dedicated to Saints Peter and Mary.

It was built on the site of a 4th century Roman temple, a square edifice known as the 'oldest cathedral' and commissioned by Maternus, the first Christian bishop of Cologne. A second church built on the site, the so-called "Old Cathedral", was completed in 818. This burned down on April 30, 1248.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License from Wikipedia.

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Chateau Frontenac


The Chateau Frontenac is a hotel in Quebec, Canada. The video that accompanies the Google Map is taken from a boat on the river that runs through the town.

Designed by architect Bruce Price, the Chateau Frontenac was one of the first of a long series of "château" style hotels built for the Canadian Pacific Railway company at the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th century. It opened in 1893. The railway company sought to encourage luxury tourism and bring moneyed travellers to its trains.


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Buckingham Fountain, Chicago


Apparently this fountain, which is located in Grant Park, Chicago, is most famous for appearing in the opening credits of 'Married With Children'. However I can't confirm this as that would be an admission to having watched the programme. The accompanying video is taken during the day, so doesn't feature the light display which runs every evening between 9pm and 10pm. The video does, however, show the scale of the fountain which is truly impressive.

The fountain runs every 20 minutes from April 1 to November 1 from 10:00 to 22:00 with a light and water display from 21:00 to 22:00.

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Taipei 101


Taipei 101 is a 101-floor skyscraper located in Taipei City, Taiwan. It is the tallest building in the world by three of the four standards designated by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. In the Google satellite shot the building still seems to be under construnction. The accompanying video is from New Year's Eve and features some amazing fireworks. Watch it all the way through it is worth your time.

Taipei 101 has 101 stories above ground (hence the name) and five underground.


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Katherine Gorge


Nitmiluk or Katherine Gorge was created by the eroding effect of the river water. Tens of thousands of years ago the water flowed on the surface of the surrounding land. The water level can easily rise 10 metres during the wet season.

Katherine Gorge borders on Arnhemland and functions as a sort of water buffer for this area. Arnhemland is a mainly aboriginal area. It is an upland plain which goes on to the ocean in the utmost north of Australia.

The water in the gorge is fresh. The crocodiles which live here are freshwater crocodiles. They are less dangerous than their saltwater cousins. They usually avoid humans.

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Kilimanjaro


Kilimanjaro is a mountain in northeastern Tanzania. It includes the highest peak in Africa at 5,895 meters. It is a giant stratovolcano, not currently active, with fumaroles that emit gas in the crater on the main summit of Kibo. Scientists concluded in 2003 that molten magma is just 400 meters below the summit crater. Although new activity is not expected, there are fears the volcano may collapse, causing a major eruption similar to Mount St. Helens.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License from Wikipedia.

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Ben Nevis


Ben Nevis (or Beinn Nibheis in Scottish Gaelic) is the highest mountain in the British Isles. It is situated in the west of Scotland, close to the town of Fort William, in Lochaber, Highland. It is one of 284 Munros (mountains in Scotland that reach an elevation of 3,000 feet (914.4 m) or more).

Ben Nevis is somewhat infamous for its inclement weather. The summit boasts the following statistics:

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Candian Parliament


The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canada's legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. According to Section 17 of the Constitution Act, 1867, Parliament consists of three components: the Sovereign (la Couronne), the Senate (le Sénat), and the House of Commons (la Chambre des communes). The Sovereign is normally represented by the Governor General, who appoints the 105 members of the Senate on the recommendation of the Prime Minister.

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CN Tower


The CN Tower, at 553.33 metres (1,815 ft., 5 inches) is the tallest building on land in the world. It is located in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and is considered the signature icon of the city. The CN Tower attracts over two million visitors annually. CN originally referred to the Canadian National Railway, but following the railway's decision to divest non-core freight railway assets during the lead-up to the company's privatization in 1995, the CN Tower was transferred to the Canada Lands Company.

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Victoria Falls


The Victoria Falls or Mosi-oa-Tunya are one of the world's most spectacular waterfalls. The falls are situated on the Zambezi River, on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe, and are roughly 1.7 km (1 mile) wide and 128 m (420 ft) high. They are considered a remarkable spectacle because of the peculiar narrow slot-like chasm into which the water falls, so one can view the falls face-on.

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